Blog | Ski Industry News

The Best Hot Toddy Recipe Known to Man

by Brandon Quinn | December 9, 2019

Why is it called a “Hot Toddy”? Who is Todd anyway? Is he some attractive Aspen ski instructor?  These are all serious questions we ask ourselves. This classic winter libation has warmed the hearts of countless skiers and snowboarders for a millennia. Some say the origins of the Hot Toddy date back to Ireland and Scotland in the 1700’s. Others argue that the beginnings of this famous winter warmer stem from India. It’s most likely the combination of all the above.

At GetSkiTickets.com, we don’t profess to be experts in history or the medicinal benefits of honey, lemon and brown liquor, but this old world remedy is sure to provide relief from a long day of skiing deep powder and zipper line mogul runs.

This is our favorite version of the “Hot Toddy”.

Ingredients:
2 pairs of fatigued legs
1½ ounce of your favorite local mountain whiskey distiller
1 tablespoon of locally sourced honey (which is an antiseptic)
½ ounce lemon juice with lemon wedge
1 cup hot water
1 cinnamon stick

Directions:
Discuss with your ski mates how deep the powder was that day and then combine the first four ingredients into the bottom of a warmed mug. If desired, garnish with the lemon, cinnamon stick. Slip into some comfortable clothing and begin discussing your next plan to purchase ski adventures through GetSkiTickets.com. 🙂

 

 

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